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And if clicking on any word pops up a site-search for articles about that word, I will close all windows in a panic and never come back.
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tneems
3232 days ago
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Connecticut
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12 public comments
jimwise
3234 days ago
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(Thank you)
kazriko
3234 days ago
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I tend to do this as well...
Colorado Plateau
Michdevilish
3234 days ago
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the highlight of my day
Canada
mrak
3234 days ago
I see what you did there
ashtonbt1
3235 days ago
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Holy carp, I thought I was the only one!
elzapp
3235 days ago
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The best is still when you highlight text, and the application automatically jumps into edit-mode, loosing the highlight. Yes, JIRA, I'm looking at you!
smadin
3235 days ago
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I know several people with this habit. I've always assumed they do it specifically to drive me bonkers. HOW can you read like that?!?
Boston
RedSonja
3235 days ago
YES. My husband does that, and I refuse to try to read anything over his shoulder because of it.
denismm
3235 days ago
It gives you a visual mark of where you were last, so your eye doesn't get lost as you scroll.
smadin
3235 days ago
I guess I just do that by...knowing where I am in the text? I wonder if there's a correlation between this behavior and moving a finger down the page of a physical book as you read.
denismm
3235 days ago
For me it depends on the site design. If it's small text in big blocks I'm more likely to do it, etc.
tdarby
3235 days ago
Well, I do it because it helps me read. That it drives other people bonkers is simply an added bonus.
RedSonja
3235 days ago
For my husband, it seems to be more of a fidgety thing. I've seen him select different bits of text 3,4,5 times without doing any scrolling. It seems like the mouse user's equivalent of running their thumbnail over the pages of the book you're reading.
Lilyheart
3234 days ago
I do it to keep my place depending on how the block of text is set up. I am a fidgety person, but I've never used my finger to keep my place on phsyical media.
rtreborb
3235 days ago
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Ugh, I hate how Chrome handles this. It does the last one, not #2
San Antonio, TX
jepler
3235 days ago
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(this habit is the real reason gnome wants to remove middle-click quick paste)
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
JayM
3235 days ago
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Guilty. Though others reading over my shoulder HATE it!
Atlanta, GA
maxdibe
3235 days ago
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I know that feel, bro.
on a bike
shrodes
3235 days ago
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Title text:

"And if clicking on any word pops up a site-search for articles about that word, I will close all windows in a panic and never come back."
Melbourne, Australia

129. MARC MARON: The social media generation

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129. MARC MARON: The social media generation

Marc Maron is a comedian and the host of my favourite podcast, WTF with Marc Maron, which is a comedy podcast where Maron interviews not only comedians, but musicians, actors, chefs and artists. His conversations are always engaging, funny, raw and honest. I recommend it especially to those who are pursuing a creative field, as most of his interview subjects have insightful and unique stories about how they became successful. (As you can tell from its title, WTF contains explicit language and is for mature listeners … you’ve been warned!)

Maron’s own success story is worth mentioning. In his 40s, having lived a life of anger, resentment, addiction, failed relationships and burnt bridges, Maron had just gotten fired from a radio gig when he started the WTF podcast as a last, desperate attempt to stay in the comedy game. The podcast not only became incredibly successful, leading to a resurgence in his stand-up career and a television series, but it’s also proven to be his salvation.

I can’t believe it’s taken me so long to do a Maron quote, as I must have listened to hundreds of hours of his voice while working on Zen Pencils. This quote is taken from his latest memoir, Attempting Normal.

RELATED COMICS: Bill Hicks It’s just a ride, Louis C.K. We don’t think about how we talk, George Carlin On assassination (explicit), Henry Rollins Who’s the crazier man?.

- Since my last comic about social media, I think it’s fair to say I’m still totally dependent and addicted to my phone. Who checks their phone as soon as they wake up and while still in bed? I do. Who takes their phone into the toilet with them? Me. It’s gross, but I bet you do it too … don’t lie. Who can’t be alone in public without looking at their phone every five minutes? Yep, me again. While I love social media (it has obviously helped Zen Pencils enormously and it’s incredible how easy I can interact with readers from all over the world), we should also remember some of its negative side effects, as this article points out.
- What are your favourite podcasts? Some of my other recommendations: Hardcore History, The Bugle, The Smartest Man in the World, The Nerdist, Stuff You Should Know, StarTalk Radio and The BS Report.

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tneems
3253 days ago
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Connecticut
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jim_carson
3256 days ago
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wow
schnuth
3251 days ago
Sad but true.

Deadpool vs Blurred Lines [A Robin Thicke's Music Video Parody]

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Deadpool’s gun is bigger than Thicke’s.

[DPiddy]

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tneems
3262 days ago
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Connecticut
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Terminal control sequences

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Using many control keys during the day, such as Ctrl-f to page down in Vim and Ctrl-c to kill a process in terminal, and assigning some of my own to tmux, I’ve began wondering whether all the letters of the alphabet were accounted for. The answer is: yes, they are; plus even some extra characters.

Most key bindings keybindings differ depending on the context, except ones in the “term” column that always keep the same function. The layers that I’m most interested in are:

  • the shell (bash/zsh with Emacs key bindings), keybindings), where I edit commands and browse history;
  • process control while running a process attached to the terminal;
  • Vim, which I use exclusively in the terminal.

I have compiled a comprehensive overview of all control key bindings keybindings in different contexts and highlighted the features that matter to me the most:

backward inc.line; bash: ?? backward inc search
term shell prompt process Vim normal
C-A start of line increment number
C-B move back a char page up
C-C SIGINT
C-D delete char send EOF half page down
C-E end of line scroll up
C-F move forward a char page down
C-G abort line file/position info
C-H <Bsp>
C-I <Tab> jump forward
C-J <LF>
C-K kill text to end of line
C-L clear screen
C-M <CR>
C-N next history move cursor down
C-O operate-and-get-next jump back
C-P previous history move cursor up
C-Q zsh: clear
line C-R C-R
redo
C-S forward inc. search* inc search
C-T transpose chars SIGINFO undo tag jump
C-U clear line half page up
C-V insert next char literally visual block mode
C-W delete word window prefix
C-X prefix, e.g. C-x,C-e decrement number
C-Y yank (delayed suspend) scroll down
C-Z SIGTSTP (suspend)
C-\ SIGQUIT
C-[ <Esc> exit insert mode
C-] jump to tag
C-^ alternate buffer

In the shell, these are indispensable:

  • C-r – Backward incremental search through history
  • C-s – Forward

    incremental search*For incremenatal searchFor

bash, C-s doesn’t work by default. default. Here’s how to enable it:
# Allow <C-s> to pass through to shell and programs stty -ixon -ixoff 

For process control:

  • C-z – Suspend a process. Useful for switching away from a man page or Vim while keeping the option to return to it intact.
  • fg (shell) – Return a process to foreground
  • jobs (shell) – List suspended processes

In Vim:

  • C-f/b – Page down/up
  • C-a/x – Increment/decrement the number after cursor. Can’t do CSS without it!
  • C-] – Jump to tag under cursor
  • C-o – Backtrack after having jumped

To learn more about navigating tags and jumps in Vim, see Vim: Revisited.

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tneems
3310 days ago
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Connecticut
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brico
3308 days ago
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so many shortcuts
Brooklyn, NY

The Middleman will return at last, as a graphic novel

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The Middleman will return at last, as a graphic novel

The brilliant but gone-too-soon Middleman series will return yet again.

Read more...

    


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tneems
3314 days ago
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New eBook: Unfuck A Monorail For Great Justice

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Have you ever encountered a monolithic Rails app?

Have you ever wondered how to get it back to the slim, flexible dexterity that it had in the early days of its development?

Would you like to know how to make large Rails test suites fast?

I've written a book which tells you how to do those things. But that's not all it does.

I've figured out some amazing hacks to accelerate the process of refactoring. Using these techniques, I shrank a code base by over 1100 lines in a single week.

Monolithic Rails apps -- or monorails -- are a problem in the world of Rails development. My new book doesn't just show you how to get them back on track. It shows you how to get them back on track more cleanly and more swiftly than you would have believed humanly possible.

Nobody's seen this book yet, but people had great things to say about my first one.

Unfuck A Monorail For Great Justice: $41, 85-page PDF



I hope it's obvious, but this book is NSFW. Unless your workplace is cool with swearing a lot. In which case, you're golden.
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tneems
3434 days ago
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Connecticut
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